Android 11 Beta Gets Postponed

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Android 11 Beta Gets Postponed

Android 11 first made its debut as a developer beta back in March, and it was all set to go public at the start of June.  Unfortunately, the pattern of event delays and cancellations will be continuing with the new release.  The public beta has officially been postponed. And most Pixel users will have to wait before seeing what’s on the horizon.

We’ll Get There Soon:

Yesterday the Android Developers Twitter account tweeted “We are excited to tell you more about Android 11, but now is not the time to celebrate.  We are postponing the June 3rd event and beta release.  We’ll be back with more on Android 11, soon.”  Originally set to be revealed at Google I/O 2020 (also cancelled), the beta would have taken the current developer beta and made it public to the world.

What does that mean?  Right now anyone with a Pixel can still get Android 11 on their phone, it just takes a little work. Here’s a post about how to flash your device. Flashing your phone allows you to load a different version of Android as long as you have access to the system image.  And that’s available on developer.android.com for anyone who wants it.  There are a few critical things to note before flashing your device. The biggest being that it erases all data from your device.  So if you wish to go this route make sure you have everything backed up!

Android 11 For Now:

Otherwise you can just hold off on upgrading to Android 11 until it’s a more streamlined process (i.e. when the public beta is released). But in the meantime you can still start learning about some of the new features that Android 11 is introducing.  From Facebook-esque chat bubbles to new notification interactions, there’s plenty to explore.

That being said, it doesn’t seem there is anything revolutionary being released in 11.  All the same its changes are welcome.  Improvements to things like permission requests and user security are always a good thing, and for the most part shouldn’t require legacy apps to change too much.  As mentioned in another post here at RootJunky an expansion on Project Mainline will also allow Google to update key parts of the OS via Google Play Store.  These will seem like subtle changes to the user, but their impacts can be huge.

Hopefully we’ll see Android 11 go public in the near future, but for now we’ll have to be patient.  What are your thoughts on the new beta?  Let us know in the comments below.

Changing Your Software In A Flash

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Changing Your Software In A Flash

Android P is the hot new software that just hit the market, and as such those ahead of the pack will be scrambling to get it on their phones.  This doesn’t mean that they have to go out and buy a phone with the newest software on it though.  By flashing your current phone you’re able to gain access to either the newest features on the market.  Or if you’re feeling nostalgic you can flash your phone to older versions as well.

The term “flashing” may be a new one to you, but if so don’t worry.  All it essentially means is that you’re loading a different version of software onto your operating system.  (Although you probably figured that out from the first paragraph).  So flashing forward can get you fancy new features, but why would you go backwards?  One reason might be to conserve battery power.  A newer version is bound to drain your battery faster, so the trade off may be worth it. 

WARNING:

Now here’s where I throw out the very important disclaimer.  Flashing your phone will erase all data from the device, and doing things wrong may brick your device. This means that if things are done incorrectly or get interrupted then you may render you phone unusable.  This is why its highly recommended to only flash a phone when its full charged.  If somehow the phone died mid process things could get tricky quickly.

That being said flashing can offer some really cool features, so if you’re careful and follow a guide to do it properly the results are worth it.  So how do you do it? There are a few things that you’ll need to make sure you have on your computer before starting the process, but overall the steps are simple.  In all flashing shouldn’t take you more than 30 minutes (and that’s moving slowly following a guide).  Google offers a step by step instructional guide on its docs page, but in order to follow this you’ll have to have the following tools:

-Android Debug Bride (ADB) and Fastboot

-A phone set to developer mode

-The correct image for the version you’re flashing to

Flashing can be a really cool experiment to undertake if you’ve never done it before and want to change how your phone works.  Just make sure you proceed with caution and charge your phone in advance.  If you really want to know more about it and get support on flashing/rooting your device Phonlab offers a course that covers just about every phone you can imagine!

TWRP 3.0.0-0 Released with new features

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TWRP 3.0.0-0 Released

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New features in TWRP 3.0.0-0:

  • Completely new theme – Much more modern and much nicer looking (by z31s1g)
  • True Terminal Emulator – Includes arrow keys, tab and tab completion, etc. (by _that)
  • Language translation – It won’t be perfect and especially some languages that require large font files like Chinese & Japanese won’t be availble on most devices. Also some languages may only be partially translated at this time. Feel free to submit more translations to OmniROM’s Gerrit. (mostly by Dees_Troy)
  • Flashing of sparse images – On select devices you will be able to flash some parts of factory images via the TWRP GUI (by HashBang173)
  • Adopted storage support for select devices – TWRP can now decrypt adopted storage partitions from Marshmallow
  • Reworked graphics to bring us more up to date with AOSP – includes support for adf and drm graphics (by Dees_Troy)
  • SuperSU prompt will no longer display if a Marshmallow ROM is installed
  • Update exfat, exfat fuse, dosfstools (by mdmower)
  • Update AOSP base to 6.0
  • A huge laundry list of other minor fixes and tweaks

WARNING: This is our first release in a long time. We have a lot of new and somewhat aggressive changes in this new release. The changes to the graphics back-end may cause some devices to not boot up properly or have other display-related issues. If you are not in a position to reflash an older build of TWRP, then wait until you are or at least wait until others have tried the new TWRP 3.0.0-0 for your specific device. You don’t want to end up with a non-working recovery and have to wait several hours or days to get to a computer to be able to fix it.

Team Win Recovery Project has been my favorite recovery ever since it was released. Dees_Troy and his team have done one amazing job at keeping up with this custom recovery and i am really thankful to them for all there hard work. If you love TWRP as much as i do please send then a little donation to say thanks 🙂

Donate to TWRP HERE

Going a quick search of the TWRP site it looks like there are already a bunch of official supported device that have builds of TWRP 3.0.0-0 available today and more to come soon i am sure, here are some of them.

Nexus 6P, Nexus 5X, Nexus 9, LG G4, Moto X Pure Edition, Moto G 2015, Galaxy Note 5. Many more are available these are just some of the mosts popular.

Click HERE to see if this new version of TWRP is available for your device.

 

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